THE FLOOD THAT DOES NOT FLOW

The Flood That Does Not Flow, 2015
(1-minute excerpt)

7 minutes, 8 seconds
Single-channel High Definition video
16:9, colour, sound

The site explored in this work is part of the Narrabeen rock series located within the Royal National Park just south of Sydney. As the filmmaker I would like to acknowledge the Traditional Custodians of the land on which this video was filmed, the Dharawal people. I pay my respects to all Elders both past and present. 

This work is an exploration of the frozen video frame, in light of its photographic heritage. A photograph, or a fixed frame, can be compared to the ancient ripples within Sydney’s sandstone. These ripples tell geologists that the grains within the rock upon which Sydney is built are derived from rocks that formed between 500-700 million years ago in an area originating in what is now Eastern Antarctica. The ripple seemingly frozen in the sandstone – like the photograph – is a closed off snapshot resonating with all that exists beyond it, both in space and time.

This work is an attempt to see, hear, and experience beyond the present moment. The video and soundscapes offer an imaginative interpretation of how the immaterial layers that exist within a space might be revealed – in particular exploring the way different temporalities resonate within – and help to shape – a space. Underpinning this work is an interest in the tension that arises from the desire to see beyond the scope of vision – to see more than what is visible in the here and now, beyond the fixed frame of a frozen image, or the churning whitewash of the high tide. 

The visibility of the rock platform, and the rock-pools that exist upon it, undergo ongoing transformations, due to the endless movement of the tides. Sometimes the rock pools can be seen and sometimes they cannot. There is a point when the tide is receding, but is not yet low enough for one to walk out on the rock platform. This is the moment when the rock pools begin to shimmer in and out of focus beneath the water – just beyond the grasp of perception.